Electric Cars and the Nationwide Charging Network

They call it range anxiety. You are driving an electric car and the charge starts dropping towards zero. What do you do?

So the smart thing to do is always carry your 120 volt plug in charger with you so you won’t be completely stranded. there are 120 volt outlets everywhere. A $2 donation to your charging host will more than pay for an entire night’s charge.

However, at a the 120 volt charging rate of 3-4 miles per charging hour, you may be waiting a while for your return trip. Given that you have a quick-charge option on your electric car, you should look into the following charging networks. I’m in Atlanta, GA so the info is based on this area, but still useful nationwide:

1. Chargepoint http://www.chargepoint.com/network/

– lots of charging stations,
– some are free to charge (mostly cars dealers)
– their charge card is free
– phone app – but only shows their locations

2. EVGo http://www.nrgevgo.com

– more hi-speed charging stations
– fewer stations overall, but in key places like shopping malls
– all cost money to charge
– $5.00 setup fee for the pay as you go plan & $5.00 per session plus charge fees – usually 20 cents per minute for hi-speed charge (30 minutes for 80% LEAF charge)

I recommend getting both cards for the best nationwide charging access. You need the cards for best use of the stations, though you can call Chargepoint without a card and they’ll activate a station over the phone for you the first time.

3. Plugshare http://www.plugshare.com/

– great site for mapping Chargepoint, NRGEVgo and independent locations
– virtual community that shares whether or not stations are available and working
– free – just sign up
– nice phone app but it takes lots of memory – I use the website with my tablet instead

Armed with these charging resources, you have a powerful antidote to range anxiety.

Electric Car Case for ROI

I recently purchased a Nissan LEAF. I’ve always wanted an electric car. I remember seeing long gas lines when I was a kid during the seventies. I’ve been following electric car progress ever since.

I n my opinion, two things now make them a very viable transportation choice:

1. Range: LEAF get 80 to 100 miles per overnight 120 V charge. Tesla’s get a lot more but they violate my #2.

2. Price: Brand new $30,000 plus LEAF are still pricey, but barely used LEAFs coming off-lease are going for only $13,000! Higher mileage LEAFs go for even less. I’ve seen some 40K mileage ones for $8,995. With really low interest rates available you can begin to get amazing ROI’s.

Many Americans are commuting 50 miles per day and spending $300 or more per month in gas.  A $13K purchase plus tax, tag, title, etc will run about $275 per month for 60 months. Yes, I think a low mileage LEAF (and its battery) will last at least that long. Add $25 to $40 a month to charge it each night and you have a vehicle that earns its keep in gas savings. If it last more than 60 months, it makes you money!

I’m sure I haven’t accounted for all the costs involved. There are probably a few more, but even at the national average of 12 cents per kwh, the LEAF yielding 4.6 miles per kwh makes it a very cost effective alternative to the average gas powered car.

One final tip: Make sure you get an electric vehicle with the quick-charge option. This help combat “range anxiety”. More about this in my next post.

Learning 2014 Highlights

This is the third year in a row I have worked “Tech Central” at Elliott Masie’s Learning conference. I count on this conference to keep abreast of important trends in the learning and management fields. This year proved no exception.  It was three solid days of stimulating presentations and dialogue.

Elliott has created a “curated content” site where you can enjoy some of the highlights of his interviews and presentations.   I have curated the curated and have added some of my own links as well to give you my personal favorites:

Nigel Paine

The Power of Search / Global Learning

Donald Taylor

Changing Competancies in Learning / Importance of Networks 

Sir Ken Robinson

Technology Impact on Memorization

Dave Hopla

Muscle Memory and Visualization  (This is one of Dave’s youtube’s )

Anne Hermann-Nehdi

The Importance of Context

Claire O’Connell

Crowdsourcing Cognitive Research

Paul LeBlanc

College for America – A new model for higher education

Globecomm

Ed Behan was found walking around the conference with a small HD video camera perched on his head.  Turns out he was broadcasting realtime HD video to the cybersphere with their new Fieldcaster unit.

Sir Ken Robinson (again)

Sir Ken also shared this wonderfully uplifting video on the Landfill Harmonic showing us how ingenuity triumphs adversity.

Have a wonderful holiday season!

Malware and Virus Threats Raise the Stakes

The recent spate of high profile commercial website hacks have shown that hackers have raised the stakes for the average business and consumer user. When normally trusted sites are compromised, users are left unprotected.

For example, you receive an email from your favorite bank, home improvement or craft store site.  You click on their coupon or special and are forwarded to their trusted site. Your email virus scanner will check the site and your browser scanner will check the page content for malware.  The next time you access that email, most scanners will not re-check.

This is no longer sufficient!  Because trusted sites are being hacked to redirect your browser to a malware site, you need virus and malware scanners that check on every click.

With state-sponsored hackers and criminal gangs funding hacker teams,  computer security threats are at an all time high.

There are three things you can do to afford yourself basic protection:

1. Make sure your operating system is up to date.  Turn on automatic updates. That means Windows XP is a no-no. Upgrade or better yet do yourself a bigger favor and get a new computer with Windows 7 or higher.

2. Enable the automatic backup feature in your operating system.

3. Use a quality virus scanner that offers click time scanning.

I think that the new level of computer security threats are so great that I will be hosting an additional blog on the topic and will be announcing it on this blog soon!

ROI, TCO and PPI

Return on Investment (ROI) is often the line manager’s measuring stick when determining which technology investment to make.  Take the savings and revenue generation across a relevant time period and divide it by the investment required.  Then determine when the investment will pay for itself.

I’ve seen some multi-million dollar technology investments pay for themselves in just six to nine months. That’s entirely possible when the technology replaces a labor intensive process.

When figuring the costs, however, don’t just stop at what the salesman says the solution will cost. Take into account the entire set of costs over the useful lifetime of the product.  Don’t forget maintenance costs, support costs, training costs, etc.  This is known as the total cost of ownership or TCO.  Solutions that last longer will often compare more favorably to short term fixes that will require a replacement solution sooner.  Of course, estimating useful life has with some complications, so be sure to get several estimates from experts who know the space.

Finally, if you must make a determination among several unrelated projects, consider using the Six Sigma Lean approach known as the Pareto Priority Index (PPI).  The PPI takes the probability of success into account and time of completion.  It’s formula is (Savings x Probability of Success) / (Cost x Time of completion).  A higher PPI indicates a higher priority.

Choosing a Windows Laptop

Need to get a new Windows laptop?

Here are some  things to consider …

Size:
TINY:  netbook size is light to carry and will fit on most airline seat trays, but hard to see and work on for long hours.  Most displays are 11″ to 13″ and the keyboard layout is cramped.
BIG: 17″ displays are the easiest to read and best to show stuff to clients when you can’t use a projector – but they are heavy and bulky to lug around
MEDIUM: 15″ displays are a compromise on all fronts. Easier to read than a netbook, lighter than a 17″ device. Will fit on many airline seat trays, but not all.

Battery life: Do you work a lot from battery – during flights or in impromptu locations like coffee shops where power is hard to get to? The bigger the battery, the longer the working session.

Video: Do you watch or present a lot of videos? If so, the Intel I5 or higher chip is the way to go. It has powerful, on-board video processing. If you just use video occasionally, save the money and go with AMD or Intel I3. The I3 gives better battery life than AMD, but often costs a bit more.

KEYBOARD: Keyboard layout is the one thing that’s so personal. That’s why it’s worth trying a laptop out at a store before buying it. Placement of the Enter, Home, End. Page Up and Page Down, cursor arrows and the Delete keys are critical and often placed in different locations. Make sure they are where you expect and won’t drive you crazy if you use them a lot.

If you have a tablet, you probably won’t benefit from a netbook.  I do have an iPad and an Acer netbook and often carry them both on trips.   I ended up buying a 17″ HP, though when clients needed to see my screens. The netbook and iPad were just too small to present videos and powerpoints.  So if you have a tablet already get least a 15″ laptop. Get a 17″ laptop if you need visibility more than portability.

Brands I’ve had good success with are: Acer, Lenovo, Gateway and HP.*

Just some words of advice from the trenches.

– Rick

* I’m not employed by any of these firms, nor have I received any compensation for their endorsement.

Leveraging Social Media for Your Event

Thank you to the more than fifty very attentive attendees of my course “Leveraging Social Media to Extend the Reach and Impact of Your Event” at the  Exhibitor 2011 conference.  My key message:  Using a combination of blogging, Twitter and podcasting before, during and after the event is much more powerful than using any one of these alone.  You can cross-promote yourself this way. You extend your reach both in terms of readers and followers. You also can extend your reach geographically by encouraging Twitter back channel  activity during your event.

Speaking  of Twitter back channel. I described three modes of Twitter back channel use:  Single Channel Presenter Feedback, Single Channel Audience Feedback, and Multi-Channel Audience Feedback using Tweetgrid or Tweetdeck.  (Note that I did not include anything about “follower feedback” ;-) ).

Here is a list of inexpensive cameras that make creating YouTube Videos quite easy: Kodak ZX10 series,  Samsung HMX series and the really inexpensive Vivitar DVR series. The most powerful tip for improving video quality is to light the scene really well.  If you do you will find any of these capture video with acceptable results for YouTube.

I promised I would give a free virtual session on Getting Started with WordPress to any of the attendees.   I’m extending this offer to any of my blog readers too. Contact me if you would like to attend.  See rollyourownblog.com for my email link.  You’ll also find the Tweetrr code for inside the firewall backchannel operation on that site.  Also contact me if you attended the session and didn’t get the handout.

I hope to hold the session by May 15, 2011 so let me know soon.